U.S Medical-Poltical Debate vs. U.S. insurance compaines “myths” about Canada’s healthcare

I live in Canada and can not believe what some Americans believe

Myth 1 Canada’s health care system is a cumbersome bureaucracy.

The U.S. has the most bureaucratic health care system in the world. More than 31 percent of every dollar spent on health care in the U.S. goes to paperwork, overhead, CEO salaries, profits, etc. The provincial single-payer system in Canada operates with just a 1 percent overhead. Think about it. It is not necessary to spend a huge amount of money to decide who gets care and who doesn’t when everybody gets covered

Myth 2: Canada’s government decides who gets health care and when they get it.

Only HMOs and insurance companies in the U.S, are the ones who do this, the only people who do this kind of deciding in Canada is the doctors.  The government has NO say in who does or doesn’t get health care in Canada.

Myth 3: There are long waits for care, which compromise access to care.There are no waits for such immediately surgery but there is a month wait for specialist’s care.  Despite such waits, however, it is noteworthy that Canada boasts lower incident and mortality rates than the U.S. for all cancers combined, according to the U.S. Cancer Statistics Working Group and the Canadian Cancer Society. Moreover, fewer Canadians (11.3 percent) than Americans (14.4 percent) admit unmet health care needs.

Myth 4: Canada’s government decides who gets health care and when they get it.While HMOs and other private medical insurers in the U.S. do indeed make such decisions, the only people in Canada to do so are physicians. In Canada, the government has absolutely no say in who gets care or how they get it. Medical decisions are left entirely up to doctors, as they should be.

There are no requirements for pre-authorization whatsoever. If your family doctor says you need an MRI, you get one. In the U.S., if an insurance administrator says you are not getting an MRI, you don’t get one no matter what your doctor thinks — unless, of course, you have the money to cover the cost.

Myth 6: There are long waits for care, which compromise access to care.There are no waits for urgent or primary care in Canada. There are reasonable waits for most specialists’ care, and much longer waits for elective surgery. Yes, there are those instances where a patient can wait up to a month for radiation therapy for breast cancer or prostate cancer, for example. However, the wait has nothing to do with money per se, but everything to do with the lack of radiation therapists. Despite such waits, however, it is noteworthy that Canada boasts lower incident and mortality rates than the U.S. for all cancers combined, according to the U.S. Cancer Statistics Working Group and the Canadian Cancer Society. Moreover, fewer Canadians (11.3 percent) than Americans (14.4 percent) admit unmet health care needs.

Myth 7: Canadians are paying out of pocket to come to the U.S. for medical care

We DO NOT PAY OUT OF OUR OWN POCKET If we have to go to the U.S. for medical care. The governess pays for us. the provincial government where you live fully funds your care.  The only Canadians who go to the U.S. and pay out of THEIR own POCKET are those who think their  care is ultra more important then its real is.

Myth8 : Canada is a socialized health care system in which the government runs hospitals and where doctors work for the government.

No its not.

Most physicians in Canada are self-employed. They are not employees of the Provincial government  nor are they accountable to the government. They only people they need to be paying attention to is their patients.  90% of doctors are paid on a fee based (unless you are a special “sick” kid like myself and to use Sick Children’s Hospital or as a an adult Mount Sinai Hospital).

Myth 9: Taxes in Canada are extremely high, mostly because of national health care.

n actuality, taxes are nearly equal on both sides of the border. Overall, Canada’s taxes are slightly higher than those in the U.S.  But We get more benefits for our tax dollars beside health-care (family allowance,tax credits,cheaper higher education, etc).

At the end of the day, the average after-tax income of Canadian workers is  about 82 percent of their gross pay. In the U.S., that average is 81.9 percent.

(for “special” needles I need to reach the height I am now were funded by the provincial  goverement after testing me as a young child. Since if we had been in the U.S. we  ((my family)) would have gone bankrupt. and I would not have this laptop or any Sims games now would I?)

Some of these “myths” is what the actual current U.S.’  health-care is like.
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